?Como se llama, llama?


Whether or not you want to know his or her name, every animal on our farm has one! And  we have an odd assortment of  “how they got their name” circumstances.  Through the years, our family has grown in number and species. We have loved each and every new addition. (Well, maybe not EVERY new addition, but I’ll never say that out loud and let it get back to them! hee, hee)

They all require attention, commitment, and dedication. I guess you can call that love, because most of the time we do it without a second thought; it is second nature to us now.

But, then there are those freezing “arctic vortex” winter nights, when I can’t sleep, because all I do is worry until dawn. They have their food, shelter, (and the horses even have their blankets on), and although I visit them every few hours throughout the night… I still worry.  It’s during those times, that I envy the sheep. They seem to embrace the cold!! They look like big “Hostess Snowballs” nestled down in the snow rather than in their straw and hay-bedded shelter.

The llamas seem to have it the roughest no matter what season and that’s when it’s most obvious that they are “exotic” to this region. Our climate in Kentucky is certainly no match for the Andes Mountain and yet, I selfishly can’t imagine the farm without them.

So, ?Como se llama? Well then, from Yerba, Stella, Strauna, Jenna, Viola, Mate, Fancy, Song, Dalai, Sera, Imax, Sweet Pea, Gracie, …..etc., etc.,….  We bid you good day!

Creativity Week is Here!

While creativity is discussed and valued in Western society, it seems as though it is the first thing to get pushed aside by our busy schedules. It’s not uncommon to hear about people who made music until they had children, people who painted until they got a full time job, or people who designed until they went back to school.

Sometimes, even in spaces that should encourage creativity, it is not given priority status. In the last few weeks, this was case at HeartFelt Fleece & Fiber. With the Wool Festival, ARToberFest, the Kentucky Artisan Center, and an open house to prepare for – and lots and lots of wool to wash, pick, card, and felt – it seemed as though there wasn’t much time for brainstorming, designing, and innovating. There wasn’t much time for creativity.

That’s changing this week, a week I’d marked on the shop’s calendar one month ago. We’ve named this week “Creativity Week,” and Mom and I are celebrating by allowing ourselves to create only things we’ve never made before. I’ve been working on new felted ornaments, jewelry, and wall hangings, and, before the week’s out, I’m hoping to try my hand at dyeing. Mom is creating a line of products using felted wool fabric.DSCF5304

To kick off Creativity Week, we had our first felted wall hanging class on Saturday, when community members recreated Vincent Van Gogh’s The Starry Night with felt. It was so interesting to see how they interpreted a famous piece of art, how they brought it to life in a new medium.

Four days into Creativity Week, I love how exciting this week has been, how each day has brought new challenges to solve. I have sincerely enjoyed focusing on creativity for creativity’s sake. Because we’re having so much fun, I’d love to encourage you to make some time for creativity in your week. If you do, be sure to let us know what you create!

-Kristin

We’ve been fleeced!

Fifteen years ago, I thought a sheep was a sheep. They all had open, black faces and white, spongy wool, apart from that “black sheep of the family” that so often figures into metaphors and allegories.

Around that time, my family and I moved to Kentucky, and, during our first Christmas here, we found ourselves chauffeuring animals to and from the local church’s nativity scene. From these first interactions with sheep, I loved the animals, and I spent several years researching them before deciding to welcome a small flock to our farm.

Strauna, Stella, Yerba

Strauna, Stella, Yerba

Our flock of five sheep includes a Tunis, a Shetland, a Shetland/Icelandic cross, and twin Tunis/Icelandic crosses. When sheering them each spring, I’m struck by the diversity of their fleeces – some have two-layered coats, some have wool with lots of crimp, some leave us covered in lanolin while others seem to have none at all – but the diversity of our flock pales in comparison to the wide array of fleeces that we’ve been processing at HeartFelt.

In the past week alone, we’ve been working on fine wool, coarse wool, and fiber from hair sheep, let alone several alpaca fleeces.

In our collective culture, we hear about the value of Merino wool or “baby alpaca” fiber, but the truth is that each wool and fiber has something distinctive to offer fiber artists. Coarse wools like Lincoln might look scratchy and unruly, but their strength is commendable. Fine wools, such as Romney and Merino, might lack strength and crimp, but their softness doesn’t go unnoticed. Short, spongy staples, like those from a baby doll sheep whose wool we’ve been processing, might be difficult to card, but they felt beautifully.

In short, the next time you see a label that just reads “100% wool,” it might be interesting to consider what sort(s) of sheep once wore that wool.

Wool Fest and ARToberFest

What a week!  It seemed as though we had just gotten back from a very busy weekend at Falmouth’s Wool Fest when it was time to start getting the shop put back together and ready for Cynthiana’s First Annual ARToberFest.  And, in the meantime, there was lots to be done: raw fleeces to receive and begin processing, emptied shelves to replenish, and a busy fall to plan.

Before this past weekend, the last festival we’d attended was the Sheep and Fiber Festival in Lexington, Kentucky.  At that time, we were taking processing orders, but our mill wasn’t open yet.  It was so enjoyable to attend the Wool Fest as a full-fledged mini-mill and fiber studio.  We had a wonderful time talking to fiber artists and enthusiasts from all over the region.

As much as we enjoyed the Wool Fest, our favorite part of the week was definitely the ARToberFest.  There’s something so special about being part of a festival in your hometown, where you can spend the night visiting with long-time friends.  Several people who visited our shop in celebration last night hadn’t been through the doors since Opening Day, and they couldn’t believe how much we’d grown in the last few months.  (To be honest, sometimes we can’t believe it either!)  Everyone involved in the planning and executing of the ARToberFest did a wonderful job; thank you for all your hard work!

In other news, our fall class line-up is now online.  If you’re interested in learning more about the world of fiber art, please be sure to check it out.

And, for a more thorough look at what’s going on at HeartFelt, please check out our October Newsletter.